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in Oregon State: Legislative Items past and present

Legislative items from year 2012 2012, Legislative items

   Initiative 9 notes and information I - 9, Oregon Cannabis Tax Act (OCTA). [Legalization]

   Initiative 24 notes and information I - 24, Oregon Marijuana Policy Intiative (OMPI). [Legalization]

   Initiative by Sensible Oregon notes and information Initiative by Sensible Oregon; Removes criminal and civil penalties, for adults 21 and over, for possession, cultivation, and use of marijuana. [Legalization]

   Initiative by Sensible Oregon notes and information Initiative by Sensible Oregon; Removes criminal and civil penalties, for adults 21 and over, for possession, cultivation, and use of marijuana. [Legalization]

   Initiative by Sensible Oregon notes and information Initiative by Sensible Oregon; Removes criminal and civil penalties, for adults 21 and over, for possession, cultivation, and use of marijuana. [Legalization]


Legislative items from year 2011 2011, Legislative items

   Senate Bill 777 notes and information SB 777, Removes Conditions from Qualifying List.

   House Bill 3202 notes and information HB 3202, Guts OMMA for Law Enforcements Sake.

   House Bill 2982 notes and information HB 2982, Denies "Card", and Medicine thereby, for Felony Convictions.


Legislative items from year 2010 2010, Legislative items

   Initiative 28 notes and information I-28, the Dispensary Initiative

   Initiative 73 notes and information I-73, the Oregon Cannabis Tax Act (OCTA) Initiative


Legislative items from year 2009 2009, Legislative items

   Initiative 28 notes and information I-28, the Dispensary Initiative

   Senate Bill 388 notes and information SB 388, changes the Program for Law Enforcement; Decreases amount of marijuana that may be possessed by persons responsible for marijuana grow sites to 24 ounces, etc.

   Senate Bill 426 notes and information SB 426, Expands ability of employer to prohibit use of medical marijuana in workplace

   Senate Bill 427 notes and information SB 427, Relates to drug-free workplace policies; Requires applicant for medical marijuana registry identification card to notify employer before using marijuana, etc.

   House Bill 956 notes and information HB 956, Sponsored by COMMITTEE ON JUDICIARY (at the request of Oregon Association Chiefs of Police, Oregon State Sheriffs' Association, Oregon District Attorneys Association, Oregon Narcotics Enforcement Association and Oregon Partnership) -- Modifies definitions related to marijuana for purposes of certain criminal laws; Declares emergency, effective on passage.

   House Bill 957 notes and information HB 957, Modifies provisions of Oregon Medical Marijuana Act; Declares emergency, effective on passage.

   House Bill 958 notes and information HB 958, Modifies provisions in Oregon Medical Marijuana Act related to designated primary caregivers; Declares emergency, effective on passage.

   House Bill 959 notes and information HB 959, Modifies provisions of Oregon Medical Marijuana Act; Declares emergency, effective on passage.

   House Bill 960 notes and information HB 960, Requires Department of Human Services to revoke registry identification card, marijuana grow site registration card or designated primary caregiver identification card of person who refuses inspection; Removes exception from criminal liability for person who refuses inspection; Declares emergency, effective on passage.

   House Bill 2313 notes and information HB 2313, a Land Use bill that could effect Dispensarys

   House Bill 2497 notes and information HB 2497, Relating to employment; Expands ability of employer to prohibit use of medical marijuana in workplace

   House Bill 2503 notes and information HB 2503, Relating to medical marijuana in the workplace; Prohibits discrimination in employment under certain circumstances, etc.

   House Bill 3274 notes and information HB 3274, Directs Department of Human Services to establish and operate marijuana production facility and distribute marijuana to pharmacies for dispensing to medical marijuana cardholders and designated primary caregivers, and more.

   House Bill 3371 notes and information HB 3371, Relating to driving under the influence of marijuana; declaring an emergency.


Legislative items from year 2007 2007, Legislative items

   House Bill 465 notes and information SB465, a Fire-em-All-and-let-God-sort-out bill


Legislative items from year 2005 2005, Legislative items

   House Bill 1085 notes and information SB1085, needs your attention
   Senate Bill 2693 notes and information HB2693, the "dumb bill gone bad" bill
   Senate Bill 3457 notes and information HB3457, the "Forfeiture" bill
   House Bill 717 notes and information SB717, the anti-Medical Marijuana bill
   House Bill 772 notes and information SB772, the pro-Medical Marijuana bill
   House Bill 2485 notes and information HB2485, the anti-Meth & Marijuana bill
   Senate Bill 294 notes and information SB294, the Hemp bill
   Senate Bill 397 notes and information SB397, Denies Benefits
   Senate Bill 2695 notes and information HB2695, DUI & 2nd-Hand Smoke
   House Bill 5077 notes and information HB5077, the "Rob the Sick and Dying Pot-heads" bill

Legislative items from year 2003 2003, Legislative items

   House Bill 2939 notes and information HB2939, a previous bad Medical Marijuana bill

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Info on Measure 80 as well as any related Issues. Legislation > Oregon State > M80. Info on Measure 80 as well as any related Issues. Click > here < for list of items this session.

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M80 -- Measure 80, the Oregon Cannabis Tax Act (OCTA), formerly Initiative 9.

Summary: Currently, marijuana cultivation, possession and delivery are prohibited; regulated medical marijuana use is permitted. Measure replaces state, local marijuana laws except medical marijuana and driving under the influence laws; distinguishes "hemp" from "marijuana"; prohibits regulation of hemp. Creates commission to license marijuana cultivation by qualified persons and to purchase entire crop. Commission sells marijuana at cost to pharmacies, medical research facilities, and to qualified adults for profit through state-licensed stores. Ninety percent of net goes to state general fund, remainder to drug education, treatment, hemp promotion. Bans sales to, possession by minors. Bans public consumption except where signs permit, minors barred. Commission regulates use, sets prices, other duties; Attorney General to defend against federal challenges/prosecutions. Provides penalties. Effective January 1, 2013; other provisions.


Recap Portland City Club Debate; 45 days left until Oregon votes on Measure 80

At the Portland City Club debate hosted on Friday, Paul Stanford and Josh Marquis faced off over marijuana legalization. Stanford is the Chief Petitioner for Measure 80 to legalize marijuana for adults, which voters will decide on the November ballot, while Marquis has been the District Attorney for Clatsop County since 1994 and an outspoken opponent of Oregon's medical marijuana law. Marquis gave his opening statement first after winning a coin toss, contrary to typical debate formats. In this opening statement, Marquis declared that Measure 80 was "a solution in search of a problem". He stated that people were not being arrested for marijuana in Oregon - that possession of less than one ounce of marijuana is only a ticketed offense. He also pointed to the recent raid in Southern Oregon by the DEA as evidence that the federal government "will not tolerate"

Stanford opened up by describing Measure 80 as a "historic opportunity" for Oregon to legalize marijuana for adults 21 and older and fix the "long-standing failure" of prohibition. He reflected back on the earlier prohibition of alcohol when Oregon "led the way" in ending alcohol prohibition by overturning the prohibition of alcohol prior to the Volstead Act being passed to repeal federal prohibition, and now Oregon's alcohol industry is thriving and "employing thousands and bringing money to our state." He reiterated that Measure 80 preserves DUI laws and prohibits public consumption of marijuana. It also creates jobs and revenue with a "sensible policy" for our state, he claimed. He concluded his opening statement by saying, "The war on drugs is insanity, and Measure 80 is the solution." Marquis disputed the comparison between alcohol prohibition and marijuana prohibition, because he said that alcohol prohibition attempted to outlaw "all alcohol" and that "marijuana is already available for less than an ounce" due to Oregon's decriminalization in the 70's. While this was not addressed in the debate, that is not actually true; decriminalization does not make marijuana "available", but instead simply reduces penalties for the possession of less than an ounce of marijuana to a ticket ranging from $500-1000 for each offense. However, sales of marijuana or cultivating marijuana are still criminal; in fact, both are Class A felonies under current law. This means that while the penalties are minimal for possession of less than an ounce of marijuana, providing that ounce carries serious penalties. Possession of more than an ounce of marijuana is also a felony.

Marquis claimed that driving under the influence would be a concern with legal marijuana: "Marijuana is radically different from other drugs, because it is fat soluble." He says that this means in court, "all we can tell you is that this person has consumed marijuana" but that there is no technology to identify when it was consumed. He alluded that making marijuana legal would result in people driving under the influence of marijuana. Stanford rebutted by saying that people are not "waiting" for legal marijuana to drive under the influence, and that Measure 80 will fund further research for identifying impaired drivers to assist law enforcement with enforcement of DUI laws. Stanford was asked about the state-licensing structure built into Measure 80 to oversee marijuana licensing and distribution, the Oregon Cannabis Commission. He explained that the measure was written to be "upheld in federal court" and that the state regulatory structure is a part of that argument. Marquis rebutted that 5 of the 7 commissioners will be elected by growers and processors under Measure 80. He did not feel that marijuana should be handled like "blueberries and filberts."

Marquis was then asked how Measure 80 would "affect communities of color in Oregon" and Marquis said it would not affect people of color and he noted the nearly all-white audience at the debate. He then said that since possession of less than an ounce was not a crime, that officers could not use marijuana possession as a "pretext for arrest" as they do elsewhere. Stanford rebutted with the fact that "African Americans make up 2% of the population but 9% of the prison population" here in Oregon. He noted that many parole and probation violations are a result of failing a drug test due to the use of marijuana, resulting in increased incarceration. He said that this is why the NAACP supports Measure 80. Marquis said that he did *not* feel that marijuana outlets or dispensaries would create crime but instead his concern was that legalization would make marijuana more available. He felt that marijuana was already readily available in Oregon, and he was opposed to "throwing open the doors" on making it further available. Stanford pointed out that by passing Measure 80, we can reallocate our resources to more serious crimes. He said he felt that crime rates would go down because police could focus their resources on robbery and other serious crimes.

Marquis felt that the lack of a possession limit in Measure 80 was problematic, and that if Oregonians could possess any limit, they would sell it. Stanford pointed out that there was no limit imposed because there are variations in growing marijuana that would result in variations in output and that there was no way to know what that amount should be. Marquis felt that middle-ground between the opposing positions on marijuana legalization could be obtained by rescheduling marijuana to Schedule II at the federal level. Stanford felt that middle-ground would be obtained by negotiating the terms of legalization after passage of Measure 80, as our legislature can alter and modify the law even after passage.

The moderator quoted statistics indicating that 1 in 6 inmates in the federal prison system were incarcerated primarily as a result of a marijuana offense and asked if these statistics should be considered a "measure of success" or an "indictment on the war on drugs." Marquis deflected from answering the question, and reiterated earlier statistics he quoted that claim that only 10 prisoners in Oregon are there as a result of marijuana. He claimed that changing the law in Oregon would have no impact on federal prohibition, but did admit that the federal laws were "draconian." Stanford said that he feels that passage of Measure 80 would impact the federal discussion and could result in reclassification of marijuana at the federal level. He feels that there will be a federal challenge against Measure 80, but that the Supreme Court will rule in favor of Oregon. Stanford highlighted the economic importance of hemp products, and pointed out that the hemp market is currently is a "multi-billion dollar industry that the majority of it is imported from Canada." He feels that Oregon can lead the way in being the first state to cultivate hemp for fuel, fiber and food. He said that he feels hemp will be the main economic engine and will "dwarf the drug market."

Marquis stated that hemp won't get you high, and that if the conversation was only about hemp, "we wouldn't be having a debate, we wouldn't care." Marquis said that the debate was not about hemp or agriculture, though, it was about "legalizing a drug." He said that this conflicted with earlier attempts to legalize medical marijuana, where advocates fought for the right to get the "drug" to sick people in Oregon. Marquis agreed that scheduling of marijuana obstructed research into the potential benefits and detriments of setting marijuana policy. Stanford pointed out that marijuana is one of the most heavily studied substances known to man, and that research has consistently demonstrated that marijuana is "fairly innocuous."

Marquis called Measure 80 a "bad idea" and urged a "no" vote: The fact of the matter is that you're not going to jail in Oregon for possession of marijuana. The police cannot arrest you for possession of small amounts. If you get caught with felony possession of marijuana, your odds are about, only slightly worse than winning the lottery that you might actually go to prison. And, if you get a medical marijuana card that's probably easier than getting a drivers license, you can possess a pound and a half of marijuana. So, where's the problem? There just is no problem there.

Stanford concluded with noting that marijuana use is currently at an all-time high, while alcohol and tobacco use are at all-time lows. He said, "What we are doing has failed, and we need a new approach." He lamented the reduced spending on education and the record high incarceration rate that is "driven by the war on marijuana." He said it was "easier for kids to get marijuana than it is liquor" and that it was a result of regulating alcohol. He said "Oregonians have a history of tackling tough issues in our own way", and now has an opportunity to be at the forefront of regulating marijuana. He urged a "Yes" vote on Measure 80: for Oregon's sake, for the safety of our youth, for the prosperity of our economy, for a model that will serve for the rest of our nation. Once again Oregon can lead the way. We have been a pioneer state for 150 years and we can continue to do that today.

The full audio of the debate is available from the Portland City Club website. The full video of the debate is available on Youtube.

As I continue to countdown to Election Day, upcoming topics will include the various uses for hemp, the controversy surrounding medical marijuana and how the Oregon Cannabis Tax Act 2012 will impact Oregonians. I will also focus on the conflicts with federal laws as well as the election process itself, including * who can vote * and how to register to vote. Too many Oregonians aren't even aware that Oregon will be voting on this crucial issue this November 6. This Election Day 2012 countdown will be full of information that is important to voters all throughout Oregon. * SOURCE = Recap Portland City Club Debate; 45 days left until Oregon votes on Measure 80


Group Forms In Support of Mesure 80

PORTLAND, Sept. 17 - A new group is campaigning for Measure 80, arguing that the prohibition of marijuana has failed and that new directions like that outlined in the measure must be pursued instead. Sam Chapman, co-director of the new group, Oregonians for Law Reform, said, "Ending prohibition is an idea whose time has come, again. We will urge voters to rally behind Measure 80, not get bogged down in the typical pro and con rhetoric around the details of an initiative. We must show our support for this measure to help build momentum for victory, either in November or some time soon."

With less than 60 days left until Election Day, advocates in three states-Oregon, Colorado, and Washington-are facing crunch time for fundraising and "getting out the vote" for the regulation of marijuana. OLR will advocate for Measure 80 separately from the existing initiative campaign, with a more focused message around ending prohibition, and with tactics both to reach out to mainstream voters and pro-legalization supporters. "Our strategy is centered around traditional media ad buy, campus voter registration drives, massive social media presence, as well as coordinated get out the vote efforts and earned media, such as holding town halls, fundraisers, local TV and radio appearances. We are going to run a campaign with a clear and concise message for the mainstream voters-who already agree with us that it's time to end prohibition again in Oregon," says Sam Chapman, Co-Director of the Oregonians for Law Reform.

OLR believes that the passage of Measure 80 is imperative. Measure 80 will:

  • Free up law enforcement resources spent on marijuana prohibition

  • Establish a regulated supply system that will take the profits out of the hands of criminals

  • Provide a much needed source of revenue and jobs for Oregonians

As recently as last year, Rasmussen polling showed that 56% of Americans supported ending adult marijuana prohibition. With Measure 80 on the ballot, Oregon is once again in the position to pioneer progressive public policy with its passage. Oregonians spend tens of millions of dollars per year to prosecute marijuana crimes, while cutting funding for education and other programs that are vital to our state. OLR supports all progressive law reform efforts in Oregon that make sense from a public policy standpoint with the ultimate goal of making our communities stronger and safer. * for more info, Contact:

Sam Chapman
Director
Oregonians for Law Reform
503-396-9062
Email: info@oregonlawreform.com info@oregonlawreform.com
* or visit - www.OregonLawReform.com


As expected, the opposition statements in the Voter Pamphlet consist of Shirley Morgan, the associations for the Chief of Police, Sheriffs and District Attorneys. Please read and be prepared to present an argument against these concepts, which all Oregonians will have in their voter pamphlets: Click -> here <- for more.


Oregon House Ways & Means Co-Chair Buckley Endorses Measure 80

Salem, Ore. -- Continuing the momentum of local and national support for common-sense cannabis policy in Oregon, Rep. Peter Buckley (D-Ashland) has officially endorsed Measure 80, the Oregon Cannabis Tax Act. Buckley joins an expanding list of political and community leaders around Oregon and the nation calling for an end to America’s catastrophic war on drugs. "It makes absolutely no sense to me that we continue to waste millions of dollars every year to prohibit adults from making the choice of whether to consume marijuana, especially when we could be regulating and taxing that market and funding the programs we've been cutting session after session," said Rep. Buckley, co-chair of the House Ways and Means Committee. "Oregon is a pioneer state, and I for one want us to make history this November by ending prohibition and regulating marijuana just like we regulate liquor." According to Harvard economist Jeffrey Miron, Oregon has spent more than $60 million a year on marijuana-related offenses, from local police enforcement costs to court-room costs to the millions spent on incarceration.

Measure 80 would replace a failed system of prohibition with an effective taxation-and-regulation model. While adults 21 and older would be able to purchase cannabis products only at state-licensed stores, Measure 80 also introduces tough new criminal and civil penalties for selling or providing cannabis to a minor. The measure also maintains Oregon’s strict DUII laws. "Measure 80 will make it much harder for Oregon's youth to get access to marijuana, just like we've made it hard for youth to purchase alcohol thanks to well-known and enforced liquor laws," said Yes on 80 chief petitioner Paul Stanford. "Tax-and-regulate legalization will work where prohibition has failed. Rep. Buckley's support is more proof that regulating marijuana isn't politics, it's just common-sense."

To learn more about Oregon Measure 80, visit www.vote80.org. FOR more info CONTACT: Roy Kaufmann, (503) 847-9769, press@octa2012.org


The text on this Bill can be found at: http://www.cannabistaxact.org

Status:

GOTV!

and Please donate at:

www.vote80.org

- and/or -

www.OregonLawReform.com


Details:  

> Allows personal marijuana, hemp cultivation/use without license; commission to regulate commercial marijuana cultivation/sale.

> Result of a "Yes" Vote:* "Yes" vote allows commercial marijuana (cannabis) cultivation/sale to adults through state-licensed stores; allows unlicensed adult personal cultivation/use; prohibits restrictions on hemp (defined).

> Result of a "No" Vote:* "No" vote retains existing civil and criminal laws prohibiting cultivation, possession and delivery of marijuana; retains current statutes that permit regulated medical use of marijuana.

A copy of the Bill may be found online at:

http://www.cannabistaxact.org


LTL (Letters-To-yer-Legislator, Editor, Org Director, Biz Owner)

you can send identical emails to every oregon senator (which will show as individual emails from you, to that senator) by sending To: orsen@oreg.net

you can send identical emails to every oregon representative (which will show as individual emails from you, to that representative) by sending To: orhouse@oreg.net

NOTEs - MAP's media resource center:


http://www.mapinc.org/resource/

If you go to about the middle of the page you will find the "Style Guide" with links to:

MAP Letters to the Editor Archive
Tips for Getting Letters to the Editor Published, by Platinum Letter Writer, Robert Sharpe
Letters to the Editor & Opinion Pieces, American College of Emergency Physicians
MAP Three Tips for Letter Writers
Powerful Paragraphs, ClearWriter's ClearTips
How to Write Letters to the Editor, Schaffer Library of Drug Policy
Grammar Bytes!, Grammar Instruction with Attitude
How to Communicate with Journalists, Fairness and Accuracy in Reporting
Letter Writer's Style Guide, by Chris Donald
Writing Effective Letters to the Editor, 20/20 Vision


respectfully, we suggest two main rules-of-thumb for letter writing to improve the liklihood of being published.

1. Write short declarative sentences as if you were speaking to a child, a small animal or a judge.

2. Limit yourself to 150 words.

Best of luck.


Here is .   Examples -

Example #1

will go here


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